Increased Precautions We're Taking in Response to the Coronavirus
As updates on the impact of the coronavirus continue to be released, we want to take a moment to inform you of the heightened preventative measures we have put in place at Wilmington Treatment Center to keep our patients, their families, and our employees safe. All efforts are guided by and in adherence to the recommendations distributed by the CDC.

Please note that for the safety of our patients, their families, and our staff, on-site visitation is no longer allowed at Wilmington Treatment Center.

  • This restriction has been implemented in compliance with updated corporate and state regulations to further reduce the risks associated with COVID-19.
  • We are offering visitation through telehealth services so that our patients can remain connected to their loved ones.
  • Alternate methods of communication for other services are being vetted and may be offered when deemed clinically appropriate.

For specific information regarding these changes and limitations, please contact us directly.

CDC updates are consistently monitored to ensure that all guidance followed is based on the latest information released.

  • All staff has received infection prevention and control training.
  • Thorough disinfection and hygiene guidance has been provided.
  • Patient care supplies such as masks and hand sanitizer are being monitored and utilized.
  • Temperature and symptom screening protocols are in place for all patients and staff.
  • Social distancing strategies have been implemented to ensure that patients and staff maintain proper distance from one another at all times.
  • Cleaning service contracts have been reviewed for additional support.
  • Personal protective equipment items are routinely checked to ensure proper and secure storage.
  • CDC informational posters are on display to provide important reminders on proper infection prevention procedures.
  • We are in communication with our local health department to receive important community-specific updates.

The safety of our patients, their families, and our employees is our top priority, and we will remain steadfast in our efforts to reduce any risk associated with COVID-19.

The CDC has provided a list of easy tips that can help prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue and then immediately dispose of the tissue.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Clean and disinfect objects and surfaces that are frequently touched.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care.

For detailed information on COVID-19, please visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

Suboxone FAQ

Wilmington Treatment Center helps adults struggling with opioid addiction find long-term recovery. Located in North Carolina, Wilmington is the premier rehab for opioid addiction treatment.

Disclaimer: Suboxone maintenance services are only offered at the inpatient level of care at Wilmington Treatment Center. If individuals require Suboxone maintenance at an outpatient level, our staff will work closely with them to ensure that they have appropriate referrals to another trusted facility.

Is Suboxone for me?

How do I know if Suboxone is right for me?

If you have struggled with a dependence on opioids, Suboxone can be an effective maintenance tool to help you remain drug-free as you work on your recovery. If it is determined that Suboxone may be an appropriate medication for you, our staff will present the option of incorporating it into your comprehensive plan of care. If you are in agreement with this decision, these services will be available during your time in inpatient treatment. Once your time in inpatient care has come to an end, we will then provide you with referrals to outside providers who can deliver ongoing Suboxone maintenance services.

Is Suboxone Addicting?

Can I become addicted to Suboxone?

As is the case with many medications, Suboxone can be addictive if used incorrectly. However, if you follow the guidelines set forth by the prescribing physician, you can use this medication safely and without fear of developing dependence. Suboxone works by interacting with the same brain receptors that are affected by opioids, but its use does not produce the same euphoric state that these drugs are known elicit. Instead, Suboxone reduces cravings for heroin and similar opioids, helping you to remain true to your goals for recovery.

Suboxone and Drug Screens

Will Suboxone show up on a drug screening?

If you are concerned about how Suboxone will affect the result of a drug screening, it is important to know that buprenorphine, which is the primary active ingredient in Suboxone, will only show up if the test is specifically designed to detect it. Suboxone is a safe and legal medication, and if you have a prescription for it, you should not need to worry about legal ramifications or employment complications due to your use of this medication.

Treatment Length

How long will I need to be on Suboxone?

Everyone’s treatment experience will differ slightly, and this is also true for aftercare planning. The length of time you spend on Suboxone will be based on your personal strengths and challenges, and will ultimately be decided upon by you and your treatment provider. Some people stay on Suboxone for a few months, while others find it helpful to use the drugs for many years. Since the medication remains effective for both short- and long-term use, it can be used to stop cravings and alleviate symptoms of withdrawal for as long as you need it.

Due to the fact that Suboxone is only offered at the inpatient level of care at Wilmington Treatment Center, our staff will ensure that you are given a referral for an outside provider for continuation of these services once your time in inpatient treatment has ended.

Drug Interactions

Does Suboxone interact with other drugs or medications?

In speaking with your treatment provider about a Suboxone prescription, be sure to mention any other drugs or medications you are currently using. As is the case with many medications, Suboxone can cause a strong reaction if taken in combination with certain other substances such as alcohol, sedatives, opioids, or narcotics.

What if I change my mind?

What if I no longer wish to take Suboxone? Can I stop or switch to a different medication?

Suboxone is a flexible option for those who wish to end their dependence on opioids. Because it is safe and effective for both short- and long-term use, you can taper and eventually cease your Suboxone use as you and your treatment provider see fit. Once your time in inpatient treatment at Wilmington Treatment Center has come to an end, we will refer you to an outside provider who will be able to continue to monitor your Suboxone use so that future changes can be made when necessary.

What is treatment like?

What is Suboxone treatment like at Wilmington?

At Wilmington Treatment Center, our medical team evaluates each patient to determine if Suboxone would be a beneficial addition to his or her comprehensive treatment plan. If so, patients receive a daily dose, which is administered by our nursing staff. We also offer other medications that are similar to Suboxone, such as Subutex, which is safe for pregnant women and for use in the detox setting.

During their stay at Wilmington, patients will be responsible for the cost of their insurance co-pays for Suboxone or Subutex treatments. After being discharged from our inpatient programming, patients will be referred to outpatient providers who can continue prescribing these medications for as long as they are helpful.

Wilmington is an amazing place to receive treatment and go through recovery from this deadly disease of addiction. Honestly, I would probably still be addicted to pills if I'd done anything differently.

– Megan C.
We are affiliated with the following organizations, which provide accreditation, education, and training to ensure quality behavioral health and addiction treatment.
  • American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM)
  • The Joint Commission (JCAHO) Gold Seal of Approval
  • Tricare
  • The Jason Foundation